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Anyone who has an addiction to alcohol

Who has an addiction to alcohol knows intimately what the word addiction means. It means an ongoing daily struggle with drinking. It’s an ongoing war and the alcoholic always loses because alcohol is so powerful.

You wake up in the morning declaring to yourself you will not drink that day. You have never been so serious about anything in your life. Your resolve stays strong until later when you start feeling out of it and maybe have some slight shaking. Your thinking is clouded and you feel overwhelmed. Alcohol is always somewhere in your thoughts.

You may make it a few days sober. That gives you enough time to get a look, how big a look depends on how brave you are, at the trail of debris your drinking career has left behind you. You have a lot of work to do to straighten it all out. It’s like starting a new life and it’s too much. You are overwhelmed and depressed. Where do you start? It can start with something as simple as cleaning your house, but that’s only the tip of the iceberg. There is the career or lack of one to deal with. Your finances are a mess. Your relationships are damaged and your health is shot. It’s more than you can cope with, so you say “I can’t deal with this” and pick up a drink. You will always pick up a drink when you decide that you’ve had enough and throw in the towel.

As hard as it is for an alcoholic in the early stages to believe, this is an endless cycle that can go on for decades. Some weeks will be better than others, but you will reach that point over and over. You try to pull yourself together and you start fighting alcohol again. And alcohol always wins because it is just too big for you if you don’t get some kind of help.

Alcohol and drug addiction treatment programs are for people who are suffering from either alcohol or drug addiction. Alcohol or drug abuse treatment programs are readily available all over the country to help you out of your addiction problem. Today treatment has gone above merely treating the addiction, other factors such as the physiological and psychological aspects of drug addiction are included in your rehabilitation program.

Rehabs are of different kinds and are found all over the country; some are solely in-patient rehab centers into which people with drug addiction are admitted for treatment and rehabilitation. The setting for these rehab centers are usually in serene places with beautiful grounds for walking and relaxation of inmates.

A good alcohol drug addiction treatment program will provide both group therapy and individual therapy to its patients. Such a rehab center is good because it will provide you with treatment and counseling that touch on all the factors that lead you into addiction.

A good rehab center should also have medical personnel whose duty is to carry out your detoxification process. This is necessary because after you have been weaned of your habit what follow is a sense of loss also known as withdrawal symptoms. A doctor is better placed to know what you need to curb the problem of withdrawal symptoms.

Depending on your finances and the extent of your addiction you have the option of choosing either an in patient or an out-patient alcohol drug addiction treatment program. Every rehab center has a course of treatment, you will definitely have to attend meetings and participate in discussions tailored to help you cope with the psychological effects of addiction.

Although many people have undergone these treatment programs and been fully rehabilitated, it is your commitment to follow through with the treatment that will see you to fully recover and not relapse to drug abuse. Most good rehab centers have gadgets and tools they supply to their patients to fall back on when temptation to use drugs or drink alcohol becomes high. Ensure that you get the best out of your alcohol drug addiction treatment program by doing all your are instructed by your handlers.

What is addiction? Addiction is the result of abuse. In addition, abuse is the imbalance of how you live. Too much of anything creates an imbalance.

We are all addicts of some sort, with some addictions being more sociably acceptable than others.

Part of the problem lies within the derogatory attitude people have towards the sociably unacceptable addicts. They are labelled and pushed aside, or shoved into rehab centres.
Whether rehab treatment is successful or not is questionable.
Even though individual rehabs stats show that the success rate is high; this is not accurate at all.

The problem in getting accurate stats lies with the following fact:

o People leave a rehab, have a relapse, and then very seldom go back to the same rehab. They make use of another rehab, leaving the first rehab declaring false statistics, showing close to 100% success rate.

I base all my findings on my personal experience and that of my research of six months at S.A.N.C.A. Florida, South Africa. I do not believe that you can guide people to their own truth if you have not experienced this yourself.

Then there is the false notion that the counsellors, social workers or therapists are doing an excellent job with the rehabilitation program. Most in-patients at rehabs do not have the slightest notion as to why they even started using drugs, alcohol, or both.

So, herein then the answer to what addiction is and where it comes from:

As I have already stated; addiction is only an imbalance of a person’s lifestyle.

I come from an abusive childhood, where my father was drinking too much, by far, and as a result, physically abused my mother, my younger brother, and myself to such an extent that we hid and slept in other peoples’ gardens many a night, for fear that my father would shoot us with my eldest brother’s army rifle.

We always had domestic violence of some degree, for as long as I can remember. To the extend t that we were labelled by the neighbours. Friday nights came and we knew the neighbours would call the police to come to our rescue. My sisters were thrown out of the glass doors many times. The example I received of how a father and husband should behave was not the ideal one, yet the only one. I was not exposed to other families and how other fathers and husbands treated their families, because we were labelled, and kids did not invite us to their homes, out of fear.

As an adult, I lived the example I got from my father and saw nothing wrong with my behaviour at first. I am a good person of soft nature and mean nobody any harm. This is similar to wife beaters. At first, a man will just push his wife, then slap her, then with a closed hand and maybe draw blood, and so it becomes progressively worse.

When we get to the stage when we realise that there is a problem, we blame the drugs or situation not the cause. The escapes become progressively worse and so does the method. This is the reason why so many people go back to rehabilitation centres, repeatedly.

In my experience, the incorrect approach (or rather an incomplete approach) is used to find out why this person repeats the pattern of abuse. They are not guided to find their lost tools they need to find out what it is they truly want. They are to find that spark again. “Show me what makes a man come alive and you will know the man”.

Because “we” society, and the therapists tell them that every day is a struggle and they are recovering addicts, they believe this because we are the experts on the topic. The reasons for abuse need to be addressed before any other therapy can take place. The person needs to find a way to look inside and guided to his/her own truth, as to what the root cause for this abuse is.

When a person abuses a substance he does it to get, the feeling of what he perceives how life ought to be. The substance gives the artificial vibe or feeling that is so desperately desired. The high or space you reached with the substance simulates the natural state of oneness with your creator, universe or god, in a space of nothingness, where we all originate from.

Thus, the continued use becomes (ab-use). This becomes repetitive and labelled ‘habitual personality.’ My observation has shown that highly spiritual beings are more likely to be abusers, such as painters, musicians, poets and actors.

The abusers and addicts are told by us society, that “addiction is hereditary”, and that it is a disease for which there is no outcome. Yes – addiction is hereditary, but it is hereditary through cellular memory, and not in terms of disease. The word disease (dis-ease) translates; ‘discomfort’. It is not a virus that is inhaled and which is not curable as is the popular belief. The person chooses the disease and not the disease the person. Therefore; the person can choose again, and he can choose differently. Society regards addicts as doomed for life to battle this ‘thing.’ Moreover, they give this doomed thing a name, with the name being YOU!

Addicts are convinced they will never recover, never be cured. Look at the word again: con-vinced. I say it is all a con!

Shouldn’t any person be better off after kicking a bad habit? You were just fine before you did all this non-sense. The belief is that an addict will never have a normal life and. This is taken as the truth.

Thank God, beliefs can change! In religion, this happens every day; we marry people from different religious belief groups. In order to do so we adopt another belief to get married.

A person’s brain can be retrained. People with brain injury are proving it. They get progressively better and not worse. This has been proven.

I invite you to come and join me on a one-day workshop where you will have the opportunity to discover why you do what you do, and how to de-cellular learn this behaviour.

Through playing games, music, and meditation, I have come to a self-help tool that lasts. Allow me to show you that you can burn that bridge called ‘addiction and abuse.’ This is cellular learning, and that makes for a workable society that flourishes in potential.

 

What is addiction? Addiction is the result of abuse. In addition, abuse is the imbalance of how you live. Too much of anything creates an imbalance.

We are all addicts of some sort, with some addictions being more sociably acceptable than others.

Part of the problem lies within the derogatory attitude people have towards the sociably unacceptable addicts. They are labelled and pushed aside, or shoved into rehab centres.
Whether rehab treatment is successful or not is questionable.
Even though individual rehabs stats show that the success rate is high; this is not accurate at all.

The problem in getting accurate stats lies with the following fact:

o People leave a rehab, have a relapse, and then very seldom go back to the same rehab. They make use of another rehab, leaving the first rehab declaring false statistics, showing close to 100% success rate.

I base all my findings on my personal experience and that of my research of six months at S.A.N.C.A. Florida, South Africa. I do not believe that you can guide people to their own truth if you have not experienced this yourself.

Then there is the false notion that the counsellors, social workers or therapists are doing an excellent job with the rehabilitation program. Most in-patients at rehabs do not have the slightest notion as to why they even started using drugs, alcohol, or both.

So, herein then the answer to what addiction is and where it comes from:

As I have already stated; addiction is only an imbalance of a person’s lifestyle.

I come from an abusive childhood, where my father was drinking too much, by far, and as a result, physically abused my mother, my younger brother, and myself to such an extent that we hid and slept in other peoples’ gardens many a night, for fear that my father would shoot us with my eldest brother’s army rifle.

We always had domestic violence of some degree, for as long as I can remember. To the extend t that we were labelled by the neighbours. Friday nights came and we knew the neighbours would call the police to come to our rescue. My sisters were thrown out of the glass doors many times. The example I received of how a father and husband should behave was not the ideal one, yet the only one. I was not exposed to other families and how other fathers and husbands treated their families, because we were labelled, and kids did not invite us to their homes, out of fear.

As an adult, I lived the example I got from my father and saw nothing wrong with my behaviour at first. I am a good person of soft nature and mean nobody any harm. This is similar to wife beaters. At first, a man will just push his wife, then slap her, then with a closed hand and maybe draw blood, and so it becomes progressively worse.

When we get to the stage when we realise that there is a problem, we blame the drugs or situation not the cause. The escapes become progressively worse and so does the method. This is the reason why so many people go back to rehabilitation centres, repeatedly.

In my experience, the incorrect approach (or rather an incomplete approach) is used to find out why this person repeats the pattern of abuse. They are not guided to find their lost tools they need to find out what it is they truly want. They are to find that spark again. “Show me what makes a man come alive and you will know the man”.

Because “we” society, and the therapists tell them that every day is a struggle and they are recovering addicts, they believe this because we are the experts on the topic. The reasons for abuse need to be addressed before any other therapy can take place. The person needs to find a way to look inside and guided to his/her own truth, as to what the root cause for this abuse is.

When a person abuses a substance he does it to get, the feeling of what he perceives how life ought to be. The substance gives the artificial vibe or feeling that is so desperately desired. The high or space you reached with the substance simulates the natural state of oneness with your creator, universe or god, in a space of nothingness, where we all originate from.

Thus, the continued use becomes (ab-use). This becomes repetitive and labelled ‘habitual personality.’ My observation has shown that highly spiritual beings are more likely to be abusers, such as painters, musicians, poets and actors.

The abusers and addicts are told by us society, that “addiction is hereditary”, and that it is a disease for which there is no outcome. Yes – addiction is hereditary, but it is hereditary through cellular memory, and not in terms of disease. The word disease (dis-ease) translates; ‘discomfort’. It is not a virus that is inhaled and which is not curable as is the popular belief. The person chooses the disease and not the disease the person. Therefore; the person can choose again, and he can choose differently. Society regards addicts as doomed for life to battle this ‘thing.’ Moreover, they give this doomed thing a name, with the name being YOU!

Addicts are convinced they will never recover, never be cured. Look at the word again: con-vinced. I say it is all a con!

Shouldn’t any person be better off after kicking a bad habit? You were just fine before you did all this non-sense. The belief is that an addict will never have a normal life and. This is taken as the truth.

Thank God, beliefs can change! In religion, this happens every day; we marry people from different religious belief groups. In order to do so we adopt another belief to get married.

A person’s brain can be retrained. People with brain injury are proving it. They get progressively better and not worse. This has been proven.

I invite you to come and join me on a one-day workshop where you will have the opportunity to discover why you do what you do, and how to de-cellular learn this behaviour.

Through playing games, music, and meditation, I have come to a self-help tool that lasts. Allow me to show you that you can burn that bridge called ‘addiction and abuse.’ This is cellular learning, and that makes for a workable society that flourishes in potential.

 

 

Alcoholism has in recent years been defined as a disease or addiction; however this idea can be hard for people to accept. Many alcoholics downplay the impact of their drinking, and sometimes loved ones fail to see the magnitude of the problem.

However if alcohol has become a major part of your life or the life of someone you love then it might be time to seek help. The first step to recovering from alcohol addiction is to admit that a problem exists. Until an alcoholic admits this there is no therapy that will work in the long term.

Best Solution

In the long run the best solution for treating someone with an alcohol addiction is admittance to an inpatient rehab facility. The problem with this solution is that it is time consuming and expensive. Not everyone is able to afford this kind of treatment. However when a person who has problems with alcohol is ready for treatment and receives care from an inpatient rehab facility the results can be very effective.

Medication

Medication may not sound like an ideal way to deal with alcohol addiction but it is one possible way to treat alcoholism. There are several drugs on the market that encourage an alcoholic to avoid drinking. One of the drugs that can be prescribed is Antabuse, a drug that causes severe discomfort to anyone taking it whenever they ingest alcohol. This is because the drug prevents the process of chemical elimination in the body.

Naltrexone is another drug that has been used to cut out the desire for alcohol in the first place. However the problem with both these solutions is that a relapse may occur once a person stops taking the medication. Consult your doctor about the possible use of these drugs for treatment of drinking related addictions.

Detoxification

Detoxification may be the first step in an alcohol treatment program. It is a very messy and painful step as withdrawal symptoms can cause violent reactions in patients. For this reason drugs may be used to help ease the withdrawal symptoms.

It is important that detoxification efforts are closely monitored by doctor or medical staff. Unmonitored detoxification can lead to death. For the results of detoxification to work a patient must then undergo group therapy or counseling to avoid relapsing. Drugs may also be prescribed to help the process along. Consult your doctor for the best way to go about this.

Group Therapy

Alcohol addiction is often caused by an underlying psychological reason. Limiting the amount of alcohol a person drinks may not be enough to solve the problem. To get to the underlying reason for the addiction group therapy or psychotherapy is necessary.

Alcoholics Anonymous is one of the most common and popular support groups for this purpose. If a person in the family has experienced problems with alcohol for many years it may be necessary for other family members to take part in therapy. It can be helpful for a family to work through addiction related issues together.

Limiting Consumption

Some people often try to limit their consumption of alcohol when dealing with addiction. While this may seem to work at first it is not a long term solution. People who drink in excess often continue to despite the impact their drinking habits may have on their finances, or personal relationships. Relapsing or binge drinking is common when trying this technique for treatment.

Prevention

Sometimes early intervention and prevention can help problem drinkers from avoiding a full blown addiction. Rather than going cold turkey a problem drinker learn to manage their alcohol intake and harm reduction techniques. For this method to succeed early participation in such a program is crucial.

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vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness
vitality4happiness

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